GARDP announces ‘5 BY 25’ goal in response to the growing burden of antibiotic resistant infections

[Geneva – 26 June 2019] 

GARDP calls upon the global community to work with it to develop and deliver 5 new treatments by 2025 to address the most urgent public health needs

Today GARDP announces its ‘5 BY 25’ goal to deliver five new treatments in response to the growing global threat of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). Drug-resistant infections already cause at least 700,000 deaths globally per year.1 GARDP’s five treatments will focus on the priority bacterial pathogens identified by the World Health Organization (WHO).

GARDP’s Chair of the Board, Professor Ramanan Laxminarayan said, “We are in a race against time to develop new antibiotics and make them accessible to the millions of people who need them. GARDP’s remarkable progress over the last three years in building strong partnerships and a talented team positions it well to meet this ambitious new goal. We need to work together with all stakeholders, including governments, academia and civil society, philanthropic organizations and the private sector, to make this goal a reality.

Alarming levels of resistance are now reported in countries of all income levels, with the result that hundreds of thousands of newborns are dying of untreatable sepsis, and patients are suffering from gonorrhoea and serious bacterial infections that do not respond to any available antibiotics. While AMR has the highest burden in low to middle income countries, high income countries are also greatly affected. It is estimated that 2.4 million people could die in high income countries between 2015 and 2050 without a sustained effort to contain AMR.2 Addressing AMR will be key to achieving Universal Health Coverage and meeting the Sustainable Development Goals.

Anja Karliczek, German Federal Minister for Education and Research stated, “AMR is a global problem that affects all countries, rich and poor alike. Because no country can solve this alone, joint efforts across different sectors are crucial. All nations must take responsibility and come together with innovative R&D solutions to address this global issue. This is why Germany strongly supports GARDP in bringing together all relevant stakeholders to achieve the ambitious goals that have been set. We encourage other countries to join in tackling AMR.

GARDP is an integral element of the WHO’s Global Action Plan on AMR that calls for new public-private partnerships to encourage research and development of new antimicrobial therapies. GARDP is calling on Member States, philanthropic and other global organizations to support ‘5 BY 25’ and contribute towards its target of €500 million, which will allow it to bring five new treatments that address the most urgent public health needs to patients. GARDP will launch its business plan to deliver its ‘5 BY 25’ goal on 28 October at the World Health Summit in Berlin.

Dr. Hanan H. Balkhy, Assistant Director-General for AMR Division at WHO said, “WHO strongly welcomes the progress of GARDP to date and its new ambitious ‘5 BY 25’ goal which complements WHO’s Global Action Plan on AMR. We call on all key actors to support and collaborate with GARDP in line with the UN Interagency Coordination Group on AMR.

 

About GARDP

GARDP is a not-for-profit research and development organization that addresses global public health needs by developing new or improved antibiotic treatments, while endeavouring to ensure their sustainable access. Initiated by WHO and the Drugs for Neglected Disease initiative, GARDP is an important element of WHO’s Global Action Plan on Antimicrobial Resistance that calls for new public-private partnerships to encourage research and development of new antimicrobial agents and diagnostics. For more information, www.gardp.org.

 

Media contact

Jennifer Katz
jkatz@gardp.org
+1 212 300 3673

 

References

1 O’Neill, J. (Chair) (2016). Tackling drug-resistance globally: Final Report and recommendations.

2 Interagency coordination group on antimicrobial resistance (IACG). 2019. No time to wait: securing the future from drug-resistant infections.